Faster Than a Reading Bullet: A DC Characters Book List

While some may think that this is a reference to the much, uh, chattered about “Snyder Cut” of “Justice League,” it’s more due to the fact that 1) We are both DC fans and thought that they, too deserved a list of books, and 2) ARE WE EVER GOING TO GET TO SEE “Wonder Woman: 1984”!?!?!?! The heroes, heroines (and yes, villains) of the DC Comics universe have been around for a long time, and if we thought that while they, too, wait for their time to come back into the spotlight, we could recommend some books that a few of them may enjoy!

Wonder Woman: “Sherwood” by Meagan Spooner

Like Diana, in Spooner’s take on the Robin Hood legend, Maid Marian must face what it means to be a hero in a world that’s not ready to see women in this light. Unlike Wonder Woman, however, Marian doesn’t have any super strengths, other than some skill with a bow. So instead of operating in the light, she must take on the name and persona of the recently deceased Robin of Locksley. Her story is one of bravery in the face of those who would tell her to stay in her place and that of a woman working to carve out her own space in a time and place that sees only one future for her, much like Wonder Woman’s own story.

Superman: “Lord of the Rings” by J. R. R. Tolkien

This may seem like an odd choice, pairing up a more “sci fi” hero with the most traditional fantasy series out there…but stick with me. One of Superman’s defining characteristics is his strong sense of moral obligation to his self-appointed role as protector of Earth. He’s by no means forced to do it and, largely, suffers from taking on this burden more than he possibly gains. But he does it because he knows that only he can do it and thus feels that he must do it. In this way, he’s a perfect match for many of the reluctant heroes found in the LOTR series. Most, if not all, of the members of the Fellowship join because they feel that it is the only way forward and they are the only ones who can take on their particular role. Frodo just wants to go back to the Shire. Aragorn has no interest in his kingly heritage. But they, like the others, see a void that only they can fill and so they sacrifice their own wants for the greater good. Pretty Superman-like, huh?

Joker: “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding

Who wants to see the world burn and feel justified in his belief that, removed from any societal pressure, humanity would break down into chaos?? Joker would! This classic tale of a group of boys stranded on an island who, over time, slowly lose sight of their own humanity is the perfect pairing for a villain who revels in trying to prove Batman wrong in his faith in the good at the heart of humanity and Gotham. The book description itself lists it as a novel about “the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart.” You can’t get any more Joker than that.

Batman: “The Maltese Falcon” by Dashiell Hammett

Batman has gone through many interpretations, versions, adaptations, and characterizations since his debut as a superhero for DC. But we must remember that before he was known for being a brooding vigilante or a playboy millionaire, he was known as the world’s greatest detective. Which is why a nice noire would undoubtedly appeal to him, and where else can one turn but to Dashiell Hammett’s classic “The Maltese Falcon”. This story serves as the introduction of hard boiled private eye Sam Spade, and is one of the go tos for old school noire mystery love. Like Batman, Spade searches for the truth relentlessly, gets caught up in his darker feelings, and has a weakness for the bad girls that he meets while on assignment. There’s no doubt in my mind that Batman would at least find this book relatable, if not entertaining.

Lois Lane: “Ten Days in a Mad-House” by Nellie Bly

Lois Lane, intrepid reporter and super-heroine in perhaps a more subtle way (as searching for truth in journalism is pretty darn heroic!), would have so many things to love about “Ten Days in a Mad-House”. For one, Nellie Bly was one of the first really well known woman journalists in this country, doing her work during the Victorian Era. “Ten Days in a Mad-House” would also appeal to Lois because it’s the story of Bly going undercover, pretending to be ‘insane’ so she would be committed to a mental institution so she could investigate claims of abuse and neglect of the inmates. Lois is known for being fearless, and I’m sure that she would love seeing the process and the work of a pioneer in her field.

Harley Quinn: “Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls” by Carrie Goldberg

Much like Batman, Harley Quinn has gone through a number of changes, though hers have been comparatively fast. While she used to be Joker’s codependent (and much abused) lady ‘love’, now she has found herself more independent, though still off the wall and a bit nutty. That said, the girl has a Ph.D in psychiatry, so with her own personal experiences and her love of the human mind, “Nobody’s Victim” would certainly be right up her alley. Carrie Goldberg is a victim’s rights attorney who targets serial harassers, violent exes, rapists, trolls, and stalkers, getting the kind of justice that her clients seek in hopes of preventing further victimization in the future. Her work has put her in dicey situations, but she’s tough as nails and doesn’t take crap from anyone while she confronts misogyny and abuse. Harley has had her own emancipation from this kind of thing as of late, and I think that she would love this book because of that.

There are so many other DC heroes and villains that we haven’t talked about. What books do you think some of them would like? Let us know in the comments!

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s