Whoa Baby!: Favorite Books for Babies

Given that the two of us are such heavy readers, it’s probably no surprise that our kiddos also really enjoy books (even if they’re still a little young to read themselves). So we thought it would be fun to give some recommendations of books that our babies have enjoyed, given that the holidays are coming upon us fast and you may have kiddos in your life that could use some fun books to read.

Serena’s Picks

Book: “Kitten’s First Full Moon” by Kevin Henkes

Publishing Info: Greenwillow Books, March 2004

Why Will and I Like It: I obviously like it for the kitten aspect. And as I want to forcibly instill a love of cats into my son, this was a favorite to read to him right from the get-go. Luckily, he also seems to really like it. The black and white pictures provide a lot of contrast, making it a book that even very young babies can appreciate. The story is simple and sweet with just enough repeated words that, as he’s gotten older, he can follow long and repeat some of them back. This is a Caldecott winner, so obviously it’s a big favorite with a lot of people, and there’s a reason why!

Book: “Little Blue Truck” by Alice Schertle, Jill McElmurry (Illustrator)

Publishing Info: HMH Books for Young Readers, May 2008

Why Will and I Like It: This has been a more recent favorite. I picked this book up on a whim before a long car trip this summer, and much to my surprise it became a quick favorite. The illustrations are lush and beautiful. And the bouncy, fun rhyme that makes up the story is fun for Will. He’s also recently begun to really like matching animal noises with the animal, and this book has been a perfect match for that neat, little trick. There are a bunch more “Little Blue Truck” books in this series, so I’m pretty sure he’ll be getting more for Christmas.

Book: “‘More, More, More!’ Said the Baby” by Vera Williams

Publishing Info: Greenwillow Books, 1990

Why Will and I Like this Book: This is an oldie, but a goodie. Another Caldecott nominated book, it’s been a favorite for many years. My mom got this book for Will this summer, and he had tons of fun reading it with her during our long visit. It features three short stories of babies running around being chased and loved on by their caregivers. The illustrations are gorgeous, and the rhythm and meter of the story are unique and beautiful. Will particularly appreciates having his nose, toes, and tummy tickled along with the babies in the book!

Kate’s Picks

Book: “Baby Goes to Market” by Atinuke and Angela Brooksbank (Ill.)

Publishing Info: Candlewick Press, September 2017

Why Winnie and I Like It: My daughter has books that she obsesses over, and she has gotten to the point where she recognizes the spines on her shelf and grabs them with intent and vigor. “Baby Goes to Market” by Atinuke is a favorite of both of us, though probably for different reasons. For me, it’s the gorgeous artwork, the fun way of incorporating counting into a cute story, and a setting of an African marketplace with lots of different people and imagery. I think for Winnie it’s more about the colors and the repetition of the words as a baby keeps adding items to his mother’s basket. Regardless, “Baby Goes to Market” is one that we revisit over and over again.

Book: “Look, Look!” by Peter Linenthal

Publishing Info: Dutton Books for Young Readers, 1998

Why Winnie and I Like It: This was the first book that my husband and I read to Winnie, as the black and white pictures with splashes of red is great for infant eyesight. When we incorporated reading into her bedtime routine at about three months, “Look, Look!” was the book, and it’s still a nightly read. Winnie likes the pictures, the sun and the cat especially get big smiles each night. I like the unique drawing style that probably is designed specifically for infant optics in mind. It’s a simple and generally plotless read, but we haven’t gotten sick of it yet.

Book: “Rocky Mountain Babies” by Wendy Shattil

Publishing Info: Farcountry Press, 2009

Why Winnie and I Like It: This was an impulse buy while my husband and I were visiting Rocky Mountain National Park. Who knew that it would become one of Winnie’s favorite books (one she loves so much that she once burst into tears because we weren’t getting to it fast enough)? “Rocky Mountain Babies” introduces the reader to various animals that you can find in the Rockies, all in baby form. If you like baby animals, which Winnie certainly does, this will be a hit. I, too, like cute baby animals, and the rhyming scheme is easy to memorize, so if your child is holding the book up across the room in hopes you’ll read the page they’ve selected, all you have to do is tap into the ol’ memory bank and voila. Everyone’s happy. The photos really are adorable.

Monster Mash: Books Featuring Cool Monsters

Happy early Halloween! Like everything this year, COVID is affecting everyone’s usual holiday traditions. But, while Halloween itself may not look the same as what we’re used to, there is still good ole reading holding down the fort as a prime socially distanced activity. So while you might be able to get out to the costume parties, you can still hunker down with a bowl of candy all to yourself and a few good books featuring the creepy crawlies! Here’s a list to give you some ideas!

Book: “The Beast is an Animal” by Peternelle van Arsdale

I mean, the cover speaks for itself, right? Even having read it and knowing the story and ending, looking at the cover still gives me the creeps. This is the story of Alys, a girl growing up in a village near the woods. In the woods lurks the soul eaters as well as the Beast, each as powerful and mysterious as the other. For her part, Alys knows too much, making her an object of fear by her neighbors as well. Try and hide as she might, Alys and her secrets are dragged into the light, and she soon finds herself deep in the woods itself. There she will discover not just the Beast, but the beast within herself.

Book: “Sorcery of Thorns” by Margaret Rogerson

This book definitely falls more firmly in the “fantasy” category than “horror.” But I wanted to included it for those of you (coughmecough) who are often a bit wary about wandering too deep into the scary stuff. Plus, it features some really neat monsters that are born from evil books, which is pretty unique as far as monsters go. Elisabeth has grown up in one of the Great Libraries, the massive fortresses built to not only house books, but to protect the populous from the books. Grimoires are powerful, and if not carefully warded, can burst forth into powerful monsters that can wreak havoc. But when disaster strikes and one makes its way free of the Great Library, Elisabeth is suspected and thrust out into the greater world to fend for herself. Soon she discovers that there may be more to the libraries, books, and magic altogether than she had thought.

Book: “The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon” by Stephen King

Of course a Stephen King book was going to make this list! Unlike Kate, I haven’t read as many of his books, but I did read this one as a teenager. I think the fact that it is equal parts a woodsy survival story as it is a horror novel is what initially drew me. The story features a 9-year-old girl, Trisha, who gets lost in the woods. But as if surviving alone in the wilderness while trying to find home isn’t hard enough, Trisha soon begins to suspect that she’s not completely alone. Something is out there. Something more than just wildlife. Following the good old horror trick of keeping the monster off the page for most of the book, this story will definitely raise the hairs on your arms!

Short Story: “The Damned Thing” by Ambrose Bierce

Though this is a short story as opposed to a full on novel, “The Damned Thing” is too good to be left off such a list. I read it in high school for my English class, and I was completely taken with the build of dread and partial epistolary narrative (I remember me and my friend Blake being like ‘what the HECK’ after reading it). After a man named Morgan ends up dead on a hunting and fishing trip with a friend, an inquest is called in. His companion says that he and Morgan kept hearing things, but not seeing anything, and Morgan kept referring to ‘that damned thing’ before being attacked by some invisible force. Then diary entries are produced, which chronicle Morgan’s final days as he has started to hunt a creature that cannot be seen. It’s so strange and unique, especially for the time it was written (the 1800s), and not really knowing what is going on just adds to it.

Book: “Mongrels” by Stephen Graham Jones

I just recently discovered Stephen Graham Jones and am kicking myself for not looking into his works before. So a book added to my list is his novel “Mongrels”. One might think ‘ah, a typical werewolf story’, but I have the feeling that this is probably so much more than that. Sure, it DOES have to do with a boy who is potentially going to age into his lycanthropy, but it also has a coming of age story at its very center. A boy who lives with his Aunt and Uncle has been on and off the road for his entire life, the group moving on when they’ve needed to to stay ahead of the law and suspicion. But now things are starting to catch up to them, and the boy starts to sort out his identity. Jones is known to bring in some really good social commentary into his stories, and issues of identity, poverty, and family are sure to come together in powerful ways. All while dealing with werewolves!

Book: “The Devil In Silver” by Victor LaValle

If the setting in a run down and underfunded mental institution isn’t enough to give you the creeps, why not throw in being held there against your will AND a monster with a bison head terrorizing the patients? If that sounds up your alley, “The Devil in Silver” should definitely be a monster book on your list. When Pepper is thrown into the psychiatric ward at New Hyde Hospital, he knows he doesn’t belong there as he doesn’t have a mental illness. He doesn’t remember what he did to get committed, however. And it becomes clear that being involuntarily committed is the least of his problems, as a monster with a bison head is running around at night, scaring people nearly do death. Pepper recruits a few other patients to try and help him fight the monster, and to hold the hospital accountable for its misdeeds. Super weird, and definitely unsettling as well as scary.

What monster books do you like? Let us know in the comments!

Who Wrote It: Lesser-Known Titles from Favorite Authors

Many authors don’t come out the door swinging with a blockbuster book. And even when they do, over the course of their careers, there are usually some quieter novels that somehow seem to slip beneath the radar of the general reading public’s notice. So today we’re going to dig into those backlists and highlight some lesser-known titles from a few of our favorite authors!

Serena’s Picks

Book: “The Near Witch” by V.E. Schwab

Schwab seemed to come onto the scene around 2013 when her book “Vicious” first came out and took readers by storm. Since then she’s gone on to write a number of high profile works, including one of my favorite trilogies ever, the “Shades of Magic” series. But before that came this quiet, little fantasy novel originally published in 2011. In fact, it was so quiet that it was re-released in 2019 (after Schwab’s name had gained so much more buying power) with the hopes that it would garner more readership than it did in its first outing. It’s a lovely book, and as one of her earliest books, it’s easy to see the building blocks forming here for themes that she will dive more deeply into in coming books. It’s also a stand-alone, that rare and magical beast of fantasy fiction.

Book: “Warbreaker” by Brandon Sanderson

I’ve already highlighted “Elantris” in previous lists, so while I do think that that book ranks as Sanderson’s most unknown title, I thought I’d go with another one that often gets overlooked in the huge list of titles this author’s produced. This is all subjective, of course, but I think that Sanderson first really came onto the epic fantasy scene with the release of “Mistborn,” published in 2006. So that makes this book, published in 2009, one of those strange cases where a book by an already-popular author seems to fall through the cracks. Mostly this is probably due to the stand-alone nature of the book when Sanderson was already beginning to make a name for himself as an epic fantasy series author. But this book is simply fantastic and probably has my favorite cover of all of his works. It features his usual strong female-characters and intricate magic system, this time based around color and music. It’s a delightful book and one definitely worth checking out for fans of Sanderson’s work or of epic fantasy in general.

Book: “Heart’s Blood” by Juliet Marillier

Not only is Marillier one of my favorite authors ever, but she’s been consistently producing fantasy works for over twenty years now since her first book,”Daughter of the Forest,” came out in 1999. Over that period of time, her “Sevenwaters” books and their off-shoots have been by far her most popular and well-known titles. But she’s also quietly produced several stand-alone novels and duologys. Like her first book, “Heart’s Blood” is a fairytale re-telling. What’s more, it’s a “Beauty and the Beast” re-telling! My favorite! But among the many interwoven books that Marillier has produced over time, this one stands on its own and often gets left unnoticed. Which is such a shame given how beautiful a story it is. Plus, it has a very unique approach to re-imaging one of the most popular (and challenging!) fairytales out there. If you love “Beauty and the Beast,” or fairytale re-tellings in general, this is one to add to your TBR list!

Kate’s Picks

Book: “20th Century Ghosts” by Joe Hill

Joe Hill is becoming more and more popular thanks to adaptations of his works “Locke and Key” and “N0S4A2” being brought to the TV screen, but I think that one of his lesser known titles, and one of my favorites, is the short stories collection “20th Century Ghosts”. Hill runs a complete gamut in his storytelling her, from the legitimately disturbing “Best New Horror” (in which an editor for a horror anthology tries to meet the elusive author of a twisted story), to the bittersweet “Better Than Home” (the story of a relationship between a boy with special needs and his father), to the fascinating “Abraham’s Boys” (a spin off to “Dracula” where Van Helming moves to America and raises his two sons to be vampire hunters). This collections makes it easy to find a story of Hill’s that you can relate to and enjoy, and it also shows off his vast talent as an author with a deft ability to hop from genre to genre and give them all solid representation. If you are just discovering Hill now, you definitely need to read “20th Century Ghosts”.

Book: “Fevre Dream” by George R.R. Martin

While these days most people associate George R.R. Martin as the guy who created (and has neglected to finish) “A Song of Ice and Fire”. This probably means you think high fantasy when you hear his name. But did you know that he wrote a story about a vampire on a steamboat traveling down the Mississippi River? It’s true! “Fevre Dream” was actually the first thing of Martin’s that I read, and it took me years to actually make the connection between these two very different works. In the mid 19th Century, a riverboat captain named Abner Marsh is approached by a wealthy mysterious man named York. York wants Marsh to take him down the Mississippi, though he isn’t very forthcoming as to why. Marsh, needing the money, takes the job… And then finds himself a travel companion to someone who may not be human. If you like vampire stories and Martin’s other works, give this one a shot!

Book: “The Running Man” by Richard Bachman (aka Stephen King)

This one may be a bit of a cheat, but too often have I been talking about the movie “The Running Man” with someone only to blow their minds that not only is it based on a book, it’s based on a book by Stephen King (writing as his old alias Richard Bachman). While it’s true that the movie and the book are pretty different in plot and tone, the basic premise is the same: in the first quarter of the 21st century, the U.S. has become a dystopian nightmare in which poverty, strife, and fascism have run rampant, and the most powerful man in America is the host of the show “The Running Man”. On this show people have to evade people who are trying to kill them. In the novel Ben Richards signs up in hopes of winning the prize to support his wife and baby, and has to stay alive long enough to collect. It’s dystopian angst to be sure, but it’s pulse pounding and suspenseful, and was one of the books that King got to push beyond expectations.

What are some of your favorite books that aren’t as well known by authors you love? Let us know in the comments!

Faster Than a Reading Bullet: A DC Characters Book List

While some may think that this is a reference to the much, uh, chattered about “Snyder Cut” of “Justice League,” it’s more due to the fact that 1) We are both DC fans and thought that they, too deserved a list of books, and 2) ARE WE EVER GOING TO GET TO SEE “Wonder Woman: 1984”!?!?!?! The heroes, heroines (and yes, villains) of the DC Comics universe have been around for a long time, and if we thought that while they, too, wait for their time to come back into the spotlight, we could recommend some books that a few of them may enjoy!

Wonder Woman: “Sherwood” by Meagan Spooner

Like Diana, in Spooner’s take on the Robin Hood legend, Maid Marian must face what it means to be a hero in a world that’s not ready to see women in this light. Unlike Wonder Woman, however, Marian doesn’t have any super strengths, other than some skill with a bow. So instead of operating in the light, she must take on the name and persona of the recently deceased Robin of Locksley. Her story is one of bravery in the face of those who would tell her to stay in her place and that of a woman working to carve out her own space in a time and place that sees only one future for her, much like Wonder Woman’s own story.

Superman: “Lord of the Rings” by J. R. R. Tolkien

This may seem like an odd choice, pairing up a more “sci fi” hero with the most traditional fantasy series out there…but stick with me. One of Superman’s defining characteristics is his strong sense of moral obligation to his self-appointed role as protector of Earth. He’s by no means forced to do it and, largely, suffers from taking on this burden more than he possibly gains. But he does it because he knows that only he can do it and thus feels that he must do it. In this way, he’s a perfect match for many of the reluctant heroes found in the LOTR series. Most, if not all, of the members of the Fellowship join because they feel that it is the only way forward and they are the only ones who can take on their particular role. Frodo just wants to go back to the Shire. Aragorn has no interest in his kingly heritage. But they, like the others, see a void that only they can fill and so they sacrifice their own wants for the greater good. Pretty Superman-like, huh?

Joker: “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding

Who wants to see the world burn and feel justified in his belief that, removed from any societal pressure, humanity would break down into chaos?? Joker would! This classic tale of a group of boys stranded on an island who, over time, slowly lose sight of their own humanity is the perfect pairing for a villain who revels in trying to prove Batman wrong in his faith in the good at the heart of humanity and Gotham. The book description itself lists it as a novel about “the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart.” You can’t get any more Joker than that.

Batman: “The Maltese Falcon” by Dashiell Hammett

Batman has gone through many interpretations, versions, adaptations, and characterizations since his debut as a superhero for DC. But we must remember that before he was known for being a brooding vigilante or a playboy millionaire, he was known as the world’s greatest detective. Which is why a nice noire would undoubtedly appeal to him, and where else can one turn but to Dashiell Hammett’s classic “The Maltese Falcon”. This story serves as the introduction of hard boiled private eye Sam Spade, and is one of the go tos for old school noire mystery love. Like Batman, Spade searches for the truth relentlessly, gets caught up in his darker feelings, and has a weakness for the bad girls that he meets while on assignment. There’s no doubt in my mind that Batman would at least find this book relatable, if not entertaining.

Lois Lane: “Ten Days in a Mad-House” by Nellie Bly

Lois Lane, intrepid reporter and super-heroine in perhaps a more subtle way (as searching for truth in journalism is pretty darn heroic!), would have so many things to love about “Ten Days in a Mad-House”. For one, Nellie Bly was one of the first really well known woman journalists in this country, doing her work during the Victorian Era. “Ten Days in a Mad-House” would also appeal to Lois because it’s the story of Bly going undercover, pretending to be ‘insane’ so she would be committed to a mental institution so she could investigate claims of abuse and neglect of the inmates. Lois is known for being fearless, and I’m sure that she would love seeing the process and the work of a pioneer in her field.

Harley Quinn: “Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls” by Carrie Goldberg

Much like Batman, Harley Quinn has gone through a number of changes, though hers have been comparatively fast. While she used to be Joker’s codependent (and much abused) lady ‘love’, now she has found herself more independent, though still off the wall and a bit nutty. That said, the girl has a Ph.D in psychiatry, so with her own personal experiences and her love of the human mind, “Nobody’s Victim” would certainly be right up her alley. Carrie Goldberg is a victim’s rights attorney who targets serial harassers, violent exes, rapists, trolls, and stalkers, getting the kind of justice that her clients seek in hopes of preventing further victimization in the future. Her work has put her in dicey situations, but she’s tough as nails and doesn’t take crap from anyone while she confronts misogyny and abuse. Harley has had her own emancipation from this kind of thing as of late, and I think that she would love this book because of that.

There are so many other DC heroes and villains that we haven’t talked about. What books do you think some of them would like? Let us know in the comments!

 

Beach (Backyard?) Reads: Summer 2020

Back for 2020, here is a list of some more favorite beach reads! “Beach read” is a very fast and loose term for books people read over the beautiful summer months when we really should be outside “doing things” (responsibly for a pandemic of course!) but are instead reading…maybe outside. Some people see these months as an opportunity to slog through long classics (we’re looking at you “Moby Dick”) before the busy-ness of of the fall starts up, but for the sake of this list, we’re limiting our choices to stand alone, mostly feel good books (though there’s some obvious leeway here for Kate’s horror tastes!) that could be easily brought along on vacations. Or maybe staycations this year. So, still a very loose definition, but hey, we had to start somewhere! We will select one title for each of the genres we most read.

Serena’s Picks

36524503._sy475_Fantasy Title: “The Bone Houses” by Emily Lloyd-Jones

This book took me completely by surprise last fall and ended up making my “Top 10” list for the year easily. I also feel like it went largely unnoticed by most fantasy fans. For whatever reason, the hype train seemed to have missed it, and that’s a huge shame! This book is everything I look for in my YA fantasy titles. An excellent leading lady. A humorous side kick (this time in the form of an undead goat). A great romantic lead. And a fantasy tale that verges on a fairytale retelling, this time pulling themes from “The Black Cauldron.” And, of course, per the rules of this lists, it’s a stand-alone title that is completely and utterly satisfying to read all on its own. Not going to lie, I’ve been pretty much online stalking the author ever since to see when/if she’s coming out with something new soon! You’ll be sure to hear about it when I do!

13138635Science Fiction Title: “These Broken Stars” by Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner

Man, that cover really dates this book. I mean, it’s not even ten years old (it came out in 2013), but the whole “ballroom gown” cover art for YA titles is definitely a thing of the past. While this book is technically the first in a trilogy, each book in this series tells a complete story of its own and each features a new set of characters, even if familiar faces pop up now and then in the later books. This, being the first book, definitely reads as a stand-alone. It also falls on the romantic side of science fiction and is that rare YA unicorn: a science fiction title written for young adults. It’s pretty much a survival story, as well, when our two leading characters find themselves crashed landed on a strange new world and have no one but each other to depend on. It’s been a while since I read this (and I wasn’t a fan of the sequel when I got to it and never read the third one due to that failure), but I definitely remember enjoying it, and I gave it four stars on Goodreads.

51318896._sx318_sy475_

Mystery Title: “The Body in the Garden” by Katharine Schellman

I read this one just this last spring, but it’s really stuck with me since as an exciting new beginning to a historical mystery series. Yes, yes, it’s the beginning of a series. But many mystery novels that I read are, but most can still be read individually, and this one definitely fits that bill with a solid beginning, middle, and end. Those who follow this blog know that I was pretty disappointed by the last Veronica Speedwell book to come out, so that made it all the more exciting to find a new lady sleuth. Lily Adler is a very different heroine than Veronica Speedwell. She’s a recent widow, for one things, which puts any romance plotline firmly on the backburner. She’s also a more quiet, introspective detective ala Sherlock Holmes than very flashy and bold. I really enjoyed the mystery itself, and she collects an interesting assortment of sidekicks along the way. One of whom is named Serena, so bonus!

32618152._sy475_Historical Fiction Title: “The Phantom Tree”

This is one of those historical fiction titles that definitely includes time travel, so it all borders on fantasy. But the historical fiction aspect of it is by far the predominant and other than the fact that time travel exists, it doesn’t stray much further into the realms of impossibility. The story follows Alison Bannister after she discovers a rare painting depicting a woman who is a historical mystery. But the woman in the painting, Jane Seymour, holds much closer ties to Alison than anyone would suspect, and in tracking down what happened to this woman, Alison begins to put together more puzzle pieces about her own life. The story features chapters from both Alison’s and Jane’s perspective, and the way the two’s story weaves together is both beautiful and tragic. It’s a lovey historical fiction title that is a great choice for a stand-alone read on a hot summer day.

Kate’s Picks

13129925Horror Title: “Horrorstör” by Grady Hendrix

This was my first experience with Grady Hendrix, and right away I knew that it was going to be super wacky! The book is designed like an Ikea Catalog, which told me everything I needed to know about Hendrix as an author. And “Horrorstör” is a great introduction to Hendrix’s work if you haven’t picked it up already. At the Orsk Furniture store, strange things are happening. Items are being destroyed overnight and no one knows what is happening. Amy, who works there any hates her job, is offered six hundred dollars to stay over night along with a few other employees, to keep an eye on things. But instead of vandals, they find some pretty angry spirits are at play. It has its scares, but it’s also a fun hoot as only Hendrix can deliver!

36388243._sy475_Thriller Title: “Something in the Water” by Catherine Steadman

I couldn’t pass up the chance to pick a book that takes place on a literal beach! Though this one might make you think twice about searching for oceanic buried treasure… Erin and Mark are a married couple who go on a luxurious honeymoon in Bora Bora, hoping for romance and pampering. But after a tropical storm runs through, they find a mysterious bag in the ocean… and it’s filled with a lot of money. Seeing an opportunity, they decide to keep the money, as there are no markings as to who it belongs to. But an owner it does have, and that owner will do almost anything to get it back. This apropos setting and thrilling mystery will keep you on the edge of your seat!

45754737Graphic Novel Title: “My Brother’s Husband” by Gengoroh Tagame

You want something sweet, and perhaps a little melancholy? A story about relationships between brothers, between lovers, between parents and children? A story with an adorable little girl and a delightful Canadian and a slightly neurotic single father? Then you definitely need to pick up “My Brother’s Husband” by Gengoroh Tagame! It follows the story of Yaichi, a single dad living in Tokyo, whose twin brother Ryoji has been out of touch with the rest of the family after being ostracized for being gay. When Mike Flanagan, a Canadian gay man, arrives on Yaichi’s doorstep to tell him that he is Ryoji’s widower, Yaichi’s world starts to change. You may need a tissue or two for this book, but it is lovely and adorable. I should note that it is manga and reads back to front and right to left, but it’s easy to get the hang of. And don’t let that stop you from reading this charming book.

44153387Non-Fiction Title: “The Feather Thief” by Kirk Wallace Johnson

I figured that for my non-fiction selection I should stick to a topic that is super interesting and intriguing, but isn’t steeped in blood, gore, and violence. So instead we look to a true heist story! In 2009 an American citizen strolled into the Tring Museum outside of London, and stole a number of rare bird feather specimens because he wanted to turn them into fly ties for salmon fishing. He then basically faded into thin air. Years later Kirk Wallace Johnson heard about this story, and immediately wanted to know what happened next. So he did his own investigation into it, and what he found out was staggering and strange. So if you want a true crime story that isn’t going to upset you but will still totally take you to the criminal mindset, “The Feather Thief” may be a good choice to read on a hot summer day by the backyard kiddie pool.

What books are you hoping to read this summer? Let us know in the comments!

Joint Review: “Mexican Gothic”

53152636._sx318_sy475_Book: “Mexican Gothic” by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Publishing Info: Del Rey, June 2020

Where Did We Get This Book: NetGalley; Edelweiss

Book Description: An isolated mansion. A chillingly charismatic artistocrat. And a brave socialite drawn to expose their treacherous secrets. . . .

From the author of Gods of Jade and Shadow comes “a terrifying twist on classic gothic horror” (Kirkus Reviews) set in glamorous 1950s Mexico—“fans of classic novels like Jane Eyre and Rebecca are in for a suspenseful treat” (PopSugar).

After receiving a frantic letter from her newly-wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find—her cousin’s husband, a handsome Englishman, is a stranger, and Noemí knows little about the region.

Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer: She’s a glamorous debutante, and her chic gowns and perfect red lipstick are more suited for cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing. But she’s also tough and smart, with an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: Not of her cousin’s new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not even of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi’s dreams with visions of blood and doom.

Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family’s youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help Noemí, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family’s past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness.

And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind.

Serena’s Thoughts

I love Silvia Moreno-Garcia. She’s such a unique talent.  I’ve now read three or four books by her, and they all spanned different time periods, genres, and themes. It’s truly incredible to find an author who can succeed in so many different lanes. We’ve got fairytale fantasy; we’ve got historical regency romance with a dash of fantasy; and now she comes with a new story mixing fantasy (of course) with gothic horror. And while horror isn’t typically my thing, I do like the creepy novel now and then, and this one seemed like just the thing for me.

The story definitely has some “Yellow Wallpaper” vibes, and I loved every bit of it. When Noemi arrives at the mysterious mansion, High Place, everything is just enough off to feel strange and eerie, but not too strange as to immediately raise alarm. Instead, it’s just the type of creepy dread that makes Noemi, and the reader, begin to question just where the line is drawn between reality and superimposed horror. Are their true mysteries here or is the setting, people, and house, all in their equal strangeness, just enough to spark a wild imagination?

Throughout the story, I found myself routinely falling into the classic horror-bystander role where you scream “just get out of there” at your heroes as they creep into a dark basement or linger in a mysterious place. But the author does a great job creating a situation where the threats are of the sort that if I had been in Noemi’s place, I, too, may have questioned my own reactions. This ties nicely into some fairly well-covered themes about women and how they are almost trained to question their perception of things and doubt their own observations. The question of whether one will be believed or not, or simply dismissed as hysterical, is very real today as it was in the past. And, of course, in the past and the time period during which this is set, women’s choices were that much more limited, especially when married.

I did find elements of the fantastical elements involved in the story to be a bit confusing and hard to track. A long history begins to unfold, and I wasn’t quite sure how exactly it all tied together. But most of the time, this didn’t matter as I was so caught up in the tension that it was enough to accept that it just was. I really loved the Gothic vibes that were brought into the story, and they were blended seamlessly into a location and culture where you don’t typically find this type of story. Overall, I really enjoyed this book, creepiness and all!

Kate’s Thoughts

I love the horror genre as a whole, but it’s hard to deny that a lot of the powerhouses and more popular works are very white dominated. That isn’t to say that progress isn’t being made; on the contrary, as pushes for diversity ramp up in publishing we are seeing more horror tales written by BIPOC. But we still have a long way to go. When I heard about “Mexican Gothic”, I was thrilled to see that we had a take on the Gothic genre from a perspective that wasn’t a white woman, as is the usual suspect within this kind of tale. I will admit that I was a little nervous going in, as Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s other work I’m familiar with is fantasy. Would she be able to make such a huge switch in genre tone? Turns out I was a dope to worry about it, because she nailed the scare factor and creepiness in “Mexican Gothic”.

Noemí is the perfect Gothic protagonist, as she comes from a gregarious and effervescent lifestyle in Mexico City and being thrust into the isolation of the Mexican countryside. It is the exact kind of scenario you see in the genre, and her personality of wanting to figure out what is going on, and then questioning if she is just overreacting when those around her dismiss her, feels so right for the Gothic vibes. But Moreno-Garcia takes it a couple steps further, not only taking on the themes of sexism and misogyny that are prevalent in Gothic lit, but also that of racism and prejudice. Noemí and her cousin are two Latina women who are now living in an English family’s estate, and their history of colonization in the area is what built up their wealth… and also may have something to do with the secrets they are hiding. For Noemí and Catalina, not only are they vulnerable because they are women, but also because they are brown women, and that fact is a really great way to make this story feel all the more fresh and relevant.

And the horror elements were definitely unsettling and outright scary. Not only the fantastical and supernatural ones, but also the real life horrors that Noemí discovers during her time at High Place. As Serena mentioned above, there are the questions as to whether or not Noemí is slowly losing her grip on reality, or if the things she’s experiencing, unsettling imagery and sounds and feelings, are actually happening. There were some really well described moments that made me squirm, which is exactly what I want from a Gothic horror novel.

“Mexican Gothic” is a great spooky read, and Silvia Moreno-Garcia continues to delight and show off her talents! Fans of Gothic novels absolutely need to check it out.

Serena’s Rating 9: Tension-filled and scary, this book makes it easy to feel as if you, too, are being sucked into the mysteries of High Place.

Kate’s Rating 9: A creepy and refreshing take on the genre, “Mexican Gothic” will fill all you may need from a good Gothic tale!

Reader’s Advisory

“Mexican Gothic” is included on the Goodreads lists “2020 Gothic”, and “Paper Lantern Writers: Best Own Voices Historical Fiction”.

Find “Mexican Gothic” at your library using WorldCat, or a local independent bookstore using IndieBound!

Books with Memorable Dads

Our timing is a bit off, but we have a joint review we want to post next Monday, so…Happy early Father’s Day! And since we did a post highlighting books with memorable moms, it is only right that we create similar list of books with notable fathers! We both have great husbands who we’ve seen turn  into great dads over the last year, so we’re excited for this theme. Again, however, our list will include memorable father figures, so some may be good while other…not.

6969Book: “Emma” by Jane Austen

I’m in the middle of my reviews for this book for my “Year with Jane Austen” re-read, and it’s really reminding me how much of a figure Mr. Woodhouse, Emma’s father, plays in the story. (Plus, I featured Mrs. Bennett from “Pride and Prejudice” in the last post, and what’s a good list without some shoe-horned Jane Austen book wedged in??) But Mr. Woodhouse is truly a great father figure. While he’s eccentric and needy, it’s also clear that he loves Emma more than anything. Emma herself declares early in the book that there’s not a wife alive who has a better position in her own than she does with her father. And even in the end, Emma is prepared to put her own marriage with Mr. Knightley on hold indefinitely because she knows that her father needs her more. But, luckily for all, Mr. Knightley decides to move in with them instead, making for a nice, little happy ending for all!

38619Book/Series: “Kate Daniels” series by Illona Andrews

I can’t spoil the series for you, but I will say that the Kate Daniels series does include a fairly notable father who plays an important role in the series. He doesn’t actually show up for several books in, but he’s referenced pretty often and only grows in importance as the series progresses. This is one of my favorite urban fantasy series, and it’s also complete, which is another bonus for anyone looking for something to jump into without needing to worry about being strung along by prolonged publishing schedules. Kate Daniels starts out as your fairly typical, badass urban fantasy heroine. But she goes through several evolutions throughout the series and is a completely different character, in many ways, by the end of the series. It also features a romance, of course, but luckily that never takes over the story or overshadows Kate’s on compelling journey.

11588 Book: “The Shining” by Stephen King

And now time for some not great examples of fatherhood: Jack Torrance. The book is pretty different than the famous movie featuring Jack Nicholson, but it’s also the same in as far as the father’s role goes. After taking a remote job as a winter caretaker for an old hotel, Jack and his family soon begin to feel just how isolated they truly are. And what once felt like a beautiful retreat, suddenly begins to feel like something more. Each, in their own way, will be touched by the powers growing around the Overlook Hotel. But Jack especially doesn’t handle things well and won’t be winning any “father of the year” awards any time soon. But he’s definitely notable, and one of the most famous fathers in literature.

6288._sy475_Book: “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy

We’re going to be staying in a darker place for this book, but unlike Jack, the father in “The Road” is a man who protects his son at all costs in the wake of an unspecified extinction event. After the world has turned into a post-apocalyptic wasteland, a man and his son are trying to make their way South in hopes of finding safety. Along the way they face harsh conditions, cannibals, violence, and a tragic past. “The Road” is not for the faint of heart, as the bleakness and disturbing imagery is all encompassing. But the relationship between father and son is deep and incredibly emotional as a man tries to keep his son safe on their journey. Definitely bring a box of tissues with you to this book. Just because Oprah picked it for her book club, that doesn’t mean it’s going to go easy on you. But the love a father has for his son is a constant shining light.

2657Book: “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee

While it’s true that the longevity of “To Kill A Mockingbird” may not be as long as we used to think in terms of how it approaches racism, one theme that still holds true is fatherhood. Atticus Finch is the single father to precocious Scout and serious Jem, and he instills patience, hard work, and tolerance into his two children. He tries to shield them from the ills of the world, but is also realistic enough that when he needs to have hard talks with his kids he is game to do so. And while he is a bit of a white savior when it comes to the African American community in the book, one aspect that still holds up is how he encourages understanding when it comes to recluse neighbor Boo Radley. Plus, raising two children on his own as a working widower during the Great Depression was never going to be easy. but Atticus does it, and raises two empathetic and curious individuals. Truly a simple but powerful depiction of fatherhood.

32075671._sy475_Book: “The Hate U Give”

While this book mostly centers on teenage girl turned activist Starr Carter, she is shaped and supported by her two parents, especially her father Maverick. When Starr witnesses a policeman shoot her unarmed friend Khalil, she is traumatized, and then begins to speak out more and more about what she saw, even when people on multiple fronts want to silence her. Maverick supports Starr in whatever she wants to do, and has also become a supportive and well respected member of his community through his own activism and role as an organizer. He not only supports the children he has with his wife, but the son he had when he was a younger man and making not very good choices. Maverick is driven and filled with pride for all of his children, and instills them with pride in their Black identities and their neighborhood. But he always prioritizes his children and their safety, especially and tensions surrounding the murder and his daughter begin to roil.

Who are some of your favorite fathers from literature? Let us know in the comments!

Books with Memorable Moms

Yesterday was Mother’s Day in the U.S., and we were celebrating with our families (or perhaps celebrating by ourselves, as one of the joys of Mother’s Day is being given a break from our kids in our honor!). Today we’ve created a list of books with memorable mother figures, some good, some…. not. 

9822Book: “Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH” by Robert C. O’Brien

In this classic children’s book, our mom is a mouse named Mrs. Frisbee. Having been recently widowed thanks to the farmer’s cat, Mrs. Frisby is left to care for her four children. Unfortunately, her home needs to be relocated due to the upcoming harvest, and it’s exactly when her youngest son, Timothy, gets sick with pneumonia and can’t be moved. So she has to turn to rats who have become hyper intelligent thanks to medical experiments performed on them, in hopes that they can help her family move safely. Mrs. Frisby will go to any lengths to protect her kids, including tangling with a cat, meeting with an owl, and putting her faith in rats she doesn’t personally know. Perhaps an unconventional mother for this list, but a wonderful one nonetheless!

89551Book: “Ramona and Her Mother” by Beverly Cleary

Ramona Quimby is well loved in the children’s literature world because of her precocious nature and her relatable and funny adventures. As she tangles with usual childhood issues, she perseveres due to her spunky nature and her family. In “Ramona and Her Mother”, Ramona (and the rest of the Quimby Family) has to adjust to both of her parents working full time, which leads to a bit of strife. Along with that, Ramona finds herself jealous of the relationship her mother has with older sister Beezus, but it’s clear that Dorothy loves both her daughters, even if they are very different people. Ramona and Dorothy have a sweet relationship between a patient mom and her free spirited child, and their realistic and fun interactions are very lovely.

7763._sy475_Book: “The Joy Luck Club” by Amy Tan

This generational family saga is filled with the stories of mothers and daughters and the complications that can come with that relationship. Especially when culture clash and the different experiences between first and second generation immigrants can cause even more strife. But it’s the heartbreaking sacrifices and choices that some of the mothers make in this book that really show the pain and uncertainty that motherhood can have, and how these choices can reverberate and have consequences for everyone. As a daughter tries to reconcile the mother who had to make unthinkable decisions, with the mother she knew, who never seemed to be understanding, the stories of all her mother’s friends come out and show the ups and downs of being a mom in difficult situations. Bring a box of tissues to this one.

233661._sy475_Book: “Carrie” by Stephen King

Mrs. White is the textbook definition of a  not good mother. She’s abusive, a religious zealot, violent, and unrelenting, and she makes her teenage daughter Carrie’s life even more a hell than the awful kids as school do. She locks her daughter in a closet when she deems her as misbehaving, she psychologically torments her, and even goes so far as to trying to kill her when Carrie’s powers become impossible to hide. Flat out, she’s one of the worst mothers in literature! But she makes this list because she is the kind of fictional mother who makes those of us with imperfect but good mothers thankful that we have them.

1885Book: “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen

While nowhere near Mrs. White’s levels of bad mothering, Mrs. Bennett is another famous fictional mother who is best known for her…unique parenting tactics. Dead set on marrying off her daughters to the richest gentleman she can find, she’s the heart of most of the comedy in this story. Sadly for her, her high ambitions are met equally with her obnoxious tendencies which often work in direct opposition to her goals. Full of nerves, gossip, and the will to shove her daughters at any eligible gentleman, she’s just lucky that her two eldest girls are charming enough to attract attention in spite of her. She’s definitely one of the more memorable mothers in classic literature and the go-to example for my own mother whenever she wanted an easy out whenever my sister and I complained or were embarrassed: “At least I’m not Mrs. Bennett!”

3._sy475_Book: “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” etc.

Molly Weasley is the quintessential mother figure in the Harry Potter series. Lily Potter, obviously, deserves a shout-out as well for her series-making decision to sacrifice her life to save her son. If she hadn’t done that, we wouldn’t even have a book. But in every meaningful way, Molly Weasley is the true mother figure in Harry’s life. And she’s everything cozy, loving, and fierce that one would expect and want from a woman who has 7 children and adopted the friends of many of those children. Throughout the series, we see many sides of this character, from her fears for her family when evil is at their door, to the smaller, domestic moments when she banishes her sons outside to take care of pesky garden gnomes that are continuously invading. And, of course, her shining moment in the last book with her rebel yell “Not my daughter, you bitch!”

Who are some of your favorite mothers from literature? Let us know in the comments!

When Things Are Hard: Our Personal Comfort Reads

We are entering month two of quarantine and social distancing for us at the Library Ladies, and it’s hard to deny that it’s wearing us down. It’s hard not to be able to see dear friends and family in person, and it’s hard to deal with uncertainty as to what the future holds with this pandemic. But we will do our best to persevere in difficult times, and one of the best ways we know how is to revisit books that bring us comfort. Here are our list of personal comfort reads that bring us joy and a little bit of hope.

Serena’s Picks

41424Book: “Beauty: A Retelling of the story of Beauty and the Beast” by Robin McKinley

I know I’ve highlighted this book before in other lists, and we even read it as a bookclub book at one point, but this wouldn’t be an honest representation of my comfort read books without including it. This is one of those feel-good books where practically nothing bad happens at all, and even the few things that seem bad turn out happy in the end. It’s my all-time favorite fairytale retelling made all the better for being a reworking of my all-time favorite fairytale. I literally have zero complaints about this book and whenever I’m feeling down, it’s one of the first that comes to mind for a quick pick-me-up. The romance is everything I like, there’s a library, there’s a horse. Really, I couldn’t ask for more. If by some bizarre chance you haven’t read this book, do yourself a huge favor and do it now!

school-aged-readersBook/s: “Harry Potter” series by J.K. Rowling

Unlike “Beauty,” I’ve mostly resisted listing “Harry Potter” on any lists. I mean, there’s no way someone hasn’t heard of these books, and many of our lists are formed around the goal of introducing books to our readers that we think they may not have come across before. Never going to happen with this. But, again, a true comfort read lists for me wouldn’t be complete without this series. Unlike “Beauty,” these books do get dark, but the tears they bring on are of the cathartic type for me, and sometimes you just need a good cry. And, of course, Rowling is a master and never leaves you down long before the adventure, fantasy, humor, and, best of all, superb characters sweep you back up.

227443._sy475_Book: “Bridget Jones’s Diary” by Helen Fielding

So, we’ve had romance, we’ve had fantasy with some needed tears, and now it’s time for the comedy. There’s not another book out there that makes me laugh so consistently at this one does. I re-read it just this last year and was literally cackling outloud next to my husband in bed. I think he thought I was a mad woman. It so perfectly hits on the inner workings of so many women’s minds, and Bridget Jones herself has to be one of the most endearing heroines ever. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that it’s loosely based on “Pride and Prejudice.” In fact, this list is aptly timed as my Jane Austen re-read is coming up on my review of the movie adaptation of this book. It differs in a few big ways, but I love that it, too, is hilarious and a comfort watch as well. Look for that movie review this Friday!

Kate’s Picks

33Book/s: “The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien

I grew up on “The Lord of the Rings”. My parents are both huge nerds, and introduced me to this world vis a vis the Bakshi animated film. They would also read me excerpts from the books and indulge me in make believe games in which I was a hobbit. I’ve read the full trilogy about five times, and have only not revisited it in full more because of other books on my pile. So whenever I am feeling low, I will undoubtedly return to Middle Earth to see a brave hobbit and his friends and allies defeat the ultimate evil. “The Lord of the Rings” is absolutely my favorite book series of all time, and the themes of triumph over darkness, hope, and friendship will always bring me joy. It especially feels all the more relevant right now, not necessarily because of fighting against an evil being (I mean, that’s a whole OTHER issue our country is facing right now), but because of the heaviness and weight of this moment. But like Gandalf says, ‘all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us’. Aaaand I’m tearing up just thinking about the beauty of this story and how much it means to me.

27712Book: “The Neverending Story” by Michael Ende

Perhaps it’s strange that as someone who is constantly talking about how she doesn’t like fantasy, I have two fantasy epics on my comfort list. But I really had to include “The Neverending Story” here, because it is one that always makes me feel a bit more at peace after I’ve read it. The story of Fantastica and Bastian Balthazar Bux is one about the power of storytelling, of imagination, and the influence that we can have on the world, be it for good or bad. What better way to escape reality than by jumping into a book where luck dragons, racing snails, and Childlike Empresses exist? This was a tween years favorite of mine, and my love for it hasn’t diminished over the years.

763588Book: “Anne of Green Gables” by Lucy Maude Montgomery

Anne Shirley is up there with Eowyn of Rohan and Jane Eyre for favorite literary heroines. The adventures of this imaginative and charming orphan as she finds her new home on Prince Edward Island are so sweet and fun, and the first book in the series continues to be my favorite. Anne is plucky and lovable, and even with all of her faults (I mean, they aren’t HUGE faults, but her temper is pretty bad) she is a relatable and endearing main character who has inspired me in so many ways. Her journey from orphan to well loved member of her own family and community is lovely, and it shows the power of love and family and taking a chance on people that you never expected to have in your life. Plus, she’s laugh out loud hysterical a lot of the time, and has overcome a lot of strife to become a confident and clever person who finds a place for herself. What could be more comforting than that?

What books do you turn to during difficult times? Let us know in the comments!

Hunkering Down: Book Series For The Long Haul

So, given that a good majority of people may be staying at home and away from crowds for awhile (or even in quarantine), we here at Library Ladies thought that we’d recommend some books that could help pass the time. Because the thing about these recommendations is that they are multi-book series! Here are some of our favorites that will keep you busy and engaged for a long while. See if your local bookstore will deliver an order to you, or if you can find them as downloadable content from your local library! But please don’t physically go to your library if it’s open. And remember everyone: be mindful, practice social distancing (or just stay home), check in on your loved ones, and wash wash wash your hands!

27861730._sx318_

Series: “The Temperance Brennan” Series by Kathy Reichs

For fans of the TV show “Bones”, did you know that it started as a book series? Well, kind of. Temperance from the TV show is very different from Temperance from the novels, but if you are in it for the forensic anthropology based mystery of it all, this series is for you! Temperance is a forensic anthropologist who works in both North Carolina and Quebec, hoping to help identify the remains of people who may not be identifiable otherwise. And she also gets into some pretty hot water, and finds herself solving dark and engaging mysteries. I love Tempe and the crimes she tackles, and while sometimes her personal life can be exhausting, she is incredibly charming as a character. Plus, given that Reichs herself is a forensic anthropologist, there are a lot of great science-y tidbits within these books!

244ehli-600x461-1

Series: “The Dark Tower” by Stephen King

We all know that Stephen King is the king of horror, but he’s also dabbled in fantasy. His best known fantasy series is “The Dark Tower”, a dark fantasy about a gunslinger, a man in black, and multiple universes that are all potentially in danger. Roland Deschain is a member of an important order of knight like beings called Gunslingers, and his world seems to be falling apart. He hopes that if he can find a place called “The Dark Tower”, as it may be the key to saving not only his world, but also all the worlds in all dimensions. But, of course, there is a man who thrives on the chaos and violence of these universes, and a showdown between Roland and The Man in Black (aka RANDALL FLAGG!!) seems almost inevitable. This is what I like to call a ‘commitment’, as many of the books in this series are looooooong. Therefore, they will take up a lot of that time we will all need to kill while we wait out our social distancing measures.

75235137f3e426515a6671606e309610

Series: “The Sandman” by Neil Gaiman

If you haven’t read anything by Neil Gaiman, a wonderful place to start would be with his epic comic fantasy opus “Sandman”. This epic fantasy series deals with Dream, or Morpheus, the being that controls sleep and dreaming and stories. This series is about him and his siblings, The Endless, and how they control and represent many powers of the universe. Part fantasy, part horror, part mythology, “Sandman” is one of the greatest comic series of all time, being  one of Vertigo’s first titles and beloved by many fantasy and comics fans to this day. It’s hard to really describe this series, in it’s eerie, ephemeral and philosophical leanings. But it’s captivating and lovely, and will no doubt take you to a world you never expected, and may not want to leave.

wheel-of-time-1025739

Series: “Wheel of Time” by Robert Jordan

Any epic fantasy fan is at least passingly familiar with Robert Jordan’s mammoth “Wheel of Time” series. In fact, Jordan was the OG Geore RR Martin when it came to complaining about an author not finishing their series. And in Jordan’s case, fans’ worst fears were realized when he passed away before finishing the 14 book series. Luckily, Brandon Sanderson, another beloved fantasy author, was able to pick up the notes that remained and bring a conclusion to this sprawling story. Not only are there 14 books, however, each book is also hundreds and hundreds of pages long. So if you like fantasy (especially of the high fantasy variety with swords, staffs, and unique world-building), this series should have you set for quite some time. Amazon is also currently working on developing a TV series for these books, so now is a good time to get a head start before it is released!

octoberdaye-series-sweeps

Series: “October Daye” by Seanan McQuire

If epic fantasy isn’t your jam, there are a bunch of long-running urban fantasy series to check out. I’ve reviewed the “Mercy Thompson” and “Kate Daniels” series on this blog, so if you haven’t read those, they are also good options. But I wanted to shine light on another great series that I’ve been making my way through (though haven’t reviewed yet.) Like the two others, this series focuses on a young woman with connections to a secretive supernatural world. October Daye has one foot in the realm of fae and one in the human world. With her experience in both worlds, and as a knight with a liege in a fairy court, October solves mysteries and goes on adventures throughout this 13+ book series. However, while the story does eventually build towards a romance, it is much less heavily featured (at least right off the bat) than the central romances in the “Thompson” or “Daniels” series.

91-amo6abjl

Series: “Amelia Peabody” by Elizabeth Peters

Of course, no list featuring long book series could be complete without a nod to my beloved “Amelia Peabody” series. Fantasy lends itself well to long-running stories, so it’s a bit more challenging to find long series that don’t feature magical elements. But for those who enjoy mysteries and historical fiction, Amelia Peabody is the best of the best. Taking place largely in Egypt, Amelia and her family solve a range of mysteries and murders. But what makes this series really stand out is the hilarious narration of our leading lading herself! I’ve listened to a bunch of these on audiobook as well, so I recommend that option as well. Bonus, if your library has digital audiobooks available, you can listen to a bunch of these without ever leaving your house!

What are you planning on reading while spending time at home? Let us know in the comments!