Have Some Pride! YA Fiction with LGBTQ Themes

Pride is the time of year where members of the LGBTQ community can celebrate who they are and the communities that they are a part of, and promote civil rights and visibility for these communities. Given the recent violence in Orlando, threatened violence at other Pride events, and oppressive and discriminatory bathroom laws targeting trans people, it has become abundantly clear that Pride is still very important and necessary, and that the fight for safety and dignity has a long ways to go. Though June is the official Pride Month, Pride events happen throughout the summer. So we thought that it would be fun to give our recommendations for Young Adult literature with LGBTQ themes! Lots of great books with LGBTQ characters have come out of the YA writing community, and these are just a few of many great works.

11595276“The Miseducation of Cameron Post” by Emily M. Danforth

Cameron Post is an orphan living in rural Montana in the 1990s. Her parents were killed in a car accident at the same time that Cameron was having her first kiss with her best friend, Irene. Sent to live with her conservative Christian Aunt Ruth, Cameron does her best to fit in and hide her sexuality. That is, until she meets Coley, a spunky and chipper cowgirl. Cameron and Coley become fast friends, but when their relationship goes to a new level, Cameron is sent to a camp that is supposed to ‘cure’ gay and lesbian teens. This book is a tale of first great love, great heartbreak, and an empowering coming of age story. Filled with pathos and hope, “The Miseducation of Cameron Post” will make you cry, think, and smile.

“If I Was Your Girl” by Meredith Russo 26156987

Moving to live with her father and starting a new school is a new beginning for Amanda. Small town Tennessee is very different from Atlanta, but Amanda is starting to adjust. She makes some very close girl friends, and starts to fall in love with sweet and sensitive football player Grant. But Amanda is worried, because she is trans, and is scared that if everyone found out she would be humiliated, ostracized, or much, much worse. Written by Meredith Russo, a trans woman, “If I Was Your Girl” is a story about being yourself and finding acceptance. It’s also on this list because Russo has a lot of background notes and information for trans teens and trans allies alike. Amanda’s story is one that is so very important in a time of laws like HB2.

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“Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe” by Bejamin Alire Sáenz

Aristotle and Dante are as dissimilar as you can be, Ari being an angry teen who resents the life he’s living, and Dante a gentle soul with a quirky worldview. But after a chance meeting at the local swimming pool, a connection is formed and the two develop a beautiful friendship and come to more deeply understand themselves through the other’s eyes. It is also worth noting that Serena made the poor decision of bringing this book along with her when she was getting her tires changed one afternoon, and then spent the whole time sobbing into the book while trying to avoid eye contact with the very confused, 40-something year old men all sitting in the lobby with her. And Kate read it on a plane and bawled her eyes out for everyone to see while her husband pretended to not know her. It was awkward for both, but a testament to the true beauty and poignancy of this story.

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“Huntress” by Malinda Lo

The prequel to the also Malinda Lo’s also excellent novel “Ash,” “Huntress” follows the story of two teenage girls who set out on a quest to restore order to a failing world. As even this list highlights, many of YA LGBTQ stories out there take place in a real world setting, so this fantasy novel featuring a beautiful, slow-burn romance between two girls is a bit of a rarity. What’s more, Lo creates a world where the two girls’ sexuality is not a cause for them to be ostracized, which allows the author to explore other challenges for her characters and present a wholly new story.

13262783 “Every Day” by David Levithan

“A” wakes up every day in a different body and lives the life of that person. For just one day. The next “A” is someone else. Boy, girl, rich, poor, able-bodied, disabled. To survive, “A” creates a set of rules to follow to preserve sanity. Until “A” meets a teenage girl named Rhiannon and finds someone to spend every day with. Levithan takes what sounds like an absolutely bonkers premises and uses it to explore such a wide variety of world views and life styles. The fact that “A” lives life every day in a different body leaves the character’s sexuality as one that goes deeper than gender. “A” loves Rhiannon, regardless of the gender “A” currently inhabits.

These are our YA LGBTQ picks. What are some of your favorites?

Joint Review: Our Favorite “Beach Reads”

“Beach read” is a very fast and loose term for books people read over the beautiful summer months when we really should be outside “doing things” but are instead reading…maybe outside. Some people see these months as an opportunity to slog through long classics (we’re looking at you “Moby Dick”) before the busy-ness of of the fall starts up, but for the sake of this list, we’re limiting our choices to stand alone, mostly feel good books (though there’s some obvious leeway here for Kate’s horror tastes!) that could be easily brought along on vacations. So, still a very loose definition, but hey, we had to start somewhere! We will select one title for each of the genres we most read.

Serena’s Picks:

7973 Fantasy Title: “Enchantment” by Orson Scott Card

This is one of my all-time favorite fairy tale re-tellings. Based loosely on the story of “Sleepy Beauty,” Card re-frames his story as seen through the eyes of Ivan and sets his story in eastern Europe. What makes this story truly unique, however, is the decision to tell this story as more of a time travel adventure than a classic fantasy story, set in a fantasy land. Ivan and Katerina are fun characters (if very frustrating in their own ways of handling what has to be a bizarre situation), and the Russian setting and history is particularly interesting. A must-read for fairy tale lovers.

9969571Science Fiction Title: “Ready Player One” by Ernest Cline

In many ways, I think this book seemed to come out of nowhere and take the reading public by surprise. Especially today, when society is going through a “nerdom renaissance” of sorts, Cline’s love letter to 80s nostalgia and video gaming culture was an instant hit. And while pre-existing knowledge of pop culture references will make this book especially fun, it is by no means necessary. Fans of “Ender’s Game” (hey there, Orson Scott Card, long time no see!) are sure to love this sci-fi action adventure! Also, a movie is in the works, so take this opportunity to get ahead of the game.

188230Mystery Title: “Crocodile on the Sandbank”  by Elizabeth Peters

I only recently discovered this mystery series, but it was love-at-first-read-page! There are some books that rely on many different factors (characters/plot/descriptive language/etc), but this series only needs one thing to sell itself: its narrator, Amelia Peabody. I don’t think I could name another protagonist’s voice who I enjoy more. She manages to be both a reliable and unreliable narrator at the same time, while also observing the world and those in it with the most distinct, and hilarious, voice I’ve ever encountered. Her interactions with the Egyptologist, Emerson, are particularly fun. Show up for the historical mystery, stay for Amelia Peabody herself.

12875355Historical Title: “Death Comes to Pemberley” by P.D. James

“Pride and Prejudice” is one of my all time favorite books, and the idea of a sequel is almost blasphemous. Many have tried, many have failed. However, P.D. James seems to manage it! She doesn’t attempt to recreate Austen’s own unique style, but stays true to her characters (not modernizing them, which is often the main point of failure in these type of sequels). And instead of focusing on a continued romance (often another failing), she frames the story around a mystery featuring the love-to-hate Mr. Wickham, a mystery that Darcy and Elizabeth set out to solve! There are also several little references to other Austen characters which are fun to spot.

Kate’s Picks:

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Horror Title: “Heart Shaped Box” by Joe Hill

Serena called it, my choice for horror isn’t exactly a happy book. But it is a very engrossing book. Jude Coyne is an aging rock star who likes to buy weird and creepy things off of eBay. His most recent purchase is a men’s suit that is supposedly haunted. When he gets the suit (delivered in a heart shaped box no less), he thinks that it’s just for grins. But then he starts seeing the ghost of an old man with scribbled out eyes around his house. He and his girlfriend Georgia go on a road trip to try and stop the haunting, the ghost following them the whole way. This is a fast and fun read that will keep you up at night, so perhaps save it for when you’re on a very sunny beach.

Thriller Title: “Creepers” by David Morrell21829

David Morrell may be best known for writing “First Blood,” which introduced the world to John Rambo. But he is also very well known for writing taught and creepy thriller novels outside of “First Blood.” “Creepers” is my favorite of his, and it concerns a group of urban explorers who are planning on breaking into the abandoned Paragon Hotel in Ashbury Park. One of those explorers is New York Times reporter Frank Ballenger, who hopes o profile them for an article. When they get inside they find a beautiful building that is frozen in time…. But there are other people lurking in the halls of the hotel. Hotels are no doubt the perfect setting for an unsettling story when you are on vacation in the summer months, and “Creepers” is sure to thrill you until the last twist.

22504701Graphic Novel Title: “Roller Girl” by Victoria Jamieson

“Roller Girl” may be easily dismissed as a kid’s graphic novel, but it has a lot going for it. First of all, it’s a very relatable story about a twelve year old girl named Astrid who decides that this summer she wants to sign up for roller derby camp, and thinks that her best friend Nicole is going to sign up for it too. But when Nicole decides to go to dance camp (with Astrid’s sworn enemy Rachel!!!!) instead, Astrid has to take on this summer alone. I think we’ve all been there. “Roller Girl” is a very fun and touching book about summer camp, new friends, and growing up in some hard ways. Fans of “Whip It” will no doubt find something to love in this one!

What are you planning on taking to the beach with you this summer? Let us know in the comments!

Joint Review: Our Favorite Movie Adaptations!

Happy Monday, everyone! As summer looms ever nearer, the movie season is charging forward. A number of the movies that are out or coming out have their origins in books, and because of this we thought that it would be fun to talk about our favorite movie adaptations of books. Be it because the adaptation was truthful, captured the spirit, or outdid the book altogether. So without further ado, here are our top five favorite book to movie adaptations!

Kate’s Picks:

5. Jaws (1975)

I’ll be frank. The book “Jaws” isn’t very good. But that is why the movie is so fabulous. Spielberg took some so-so source material and turned it into a taut and scary suspense film with some really great performances from Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss, and Robert Shaw, who blows the film out of the water with the amazing U.S.S. Indianapolis Speech.

4. The Silence of The Lambs (1991)

“The Silence of the Lambs” is easily one of my very favorite thrillers of all time. The movie adaptation brings the story to life, and I would argue even improves upon it much like “Jaws” did. You are so invested in Clarice Starling’s journey, played to a T by Jodie Foster, and you can’t help be repulsed yet mesmerized by Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter. And Ted Levine is extremely underrated as the twisted Buffalo Bill. A great film from a great book.

3. Carrie (1976)

“Carrie” gave this social pariah a fun revenge fantasy to indulge in when she was in middle school, though I didn’t see the dePalma movie until high school. While I feel that the newest remake captures more of the essence of the book, Sissy Spacek is the perfect Carrie White, both a victim and then (arguably) a monster. I mean, who hasn’t seen or heard of the notorious prom scene where Carrie gets her revenge on Chamberlain High? Team Carrie, though. Forever.

2. The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002), and The Return of the King (2003)

Maybe I’m cheating, but I am putting all three “Lord of the Rings” films into this because, let’s be real. “The Lord of the Rings” is a huge epic, and is meant to be one story. Peter Jackson undertook a daunting task with a beloved fantasy, arguably the greatest high fantasy epic of all time, and made it into a fabulous film series. From the casting to the music to the special effects and plotting (Gollum in particular being incredibly revolutionary and tragically fleshed out), everything was done with care. “The Lord of the Rings” is my favorite book of all time, and I was pleased with what he did with it (Arwen stuff aside).

1). Clueless (1995)

“Clueless” is one of my all-time favorite movies, and believe it or not it is based on one of Jane Austen’s books, “Emma.” And even though it takes place in 1990s Beverly Hills as opposed to Regency Era English countryside, “Clueless” is considered to be at its heart the most faithful adaptation of the novel. Cher Horowitz is a three dimensional heroine who you want to root for, and she is so very Emma even if her concerns are less about English manners and society and more about high school, popularity, and her frustrating step brother Josh. Easily my favorite movie adaptation of a book, even if it isn’t all that conventional.

Serena’s Picks:

5.) Life of Pi (2012)

Kate mentioned “Life of Pi” in our movie review of “The Jungle Book”, but it has to be included in this list, too. This book was said to be “unfilmable” for years, and I can understand why. In the hands of the wrong director, the beautiful inner journey and poignancy of the narrative could have been lost in place of a cheesy, shipwreck movie with a tiger for added flare. Ang Lee not only captures the tonal resonance of the book, but his film is absolutely gorgeous.The isolation, beauty, and drama of the story is perfectly captured while also retaining the deeper messages about life and faith from the book.

4.) Contact (1997)

Jodie Foster’s second appearance on this list! Apparently she knows how to pick her book/film adaptations! I read this book in highschool, after having already seen the movie, one of the few times I’ve read/watched in this order as I make it a general rule to try and read most books before their movie adaptations. But in this case, the order worked fine! While there are some changes between the book and the movie, additional characters and such, the tone of the book is captured perfectly in the movie. Again, an impressive feat considering that the more subtle aspects of discovery and humanity could have been easily lost in translation.

3.) The Princess Bride (1987)

Ah, “The Princess Bride,” my first love. My younger sister and I would watch this movie obsessively. It wasn’t until several years later that I even realized there was a book! What an exciting discovery! And then to find that it was even more hilarious and awesome than the movie. The fact that I had Cary Elwes as a mental image for Wesley already just helped matters. Much of the success in translation comes down to the fact that the author, William Goldman, also wrote the screenplay for the movie. So while the story is shortened and adjusted for film, the parody, tone, and witty dialogue match exactly.

2.) Jurassic Park (1993)

Like almost every kid, I had a dinosaur phase, and the fact that “Jurassic Park” sat firmly in the adult section at the library did nothing to dissuade me. I’ve re-read it since, which is good since most of the science went completely over my head as a kid, and it’s still a fun adventure. However, this is one where I would say the movie is even stronger. The book is much more interested in the science and technology of the park, and the characters, while interesting, were a bit flat. It’s the perfect structure for a movie,however, and it’s easy to see how the film was built upon this strong foundation. But with a re-focus on action and markedly more fleshed central characters, the movie surpasses the book and is one of my all time favorites to this day.

1.) Pride and Prejudice (1995)

I think it should be noted that both Kate and I listed a Jane Austen adaptation as our number one pick completely independent of each other. But really, is anyone surprised? Jane Austen is my hero. Also, this could be considered a bit of a cheat since the BBC version is a 6 hour miniseries rather than a true film adaptation. But if Kate got “Lord of the Rings,” I get this. So, given its length, this film basically is the book on screen. Much of the dialogue is directly lifted, almost all of the significant scenes and characters are included, and other than rushing the ending a bit, in my opinion, it is practically perfect in every way. Colin Firth is universally acknowledge as the definitive Mr. Darcy, and Jennifer Ehle should not be forgotten as my hands down favorite onscreen version of Elizabeth Bennett. She captures Lizzie’s spunk and wit, without losing the propriety and grace of the character (something that Kiera Knightly’s take completely lacked, in my opinion, and a balance the character needs to truly represent Lizzie as a woman worthy of admiration and esteem in her era).

So, there you have it! What are your favorite film adaptations based on books?