Kate’s Review: “Lock Every Door”

41837243Book: “Lock Every Door” by Riley Sager

Publishing Info: Dutton, July 2019

Where Did I Get This Book: I received an eARC from NetGalley!

Book Description: No visitors. No nights spent away from the apartment. No disturbing the other residents, all of whom are rich or famous or both. These are the only rules for Jules Larsen’s new job as an apartment sitter at the Bartholomew, one of Manhattan’s most high-profile and mysterious buildings. Recently heartbroken and just plain broke, Jules is taken in by the splendor of her surroundings and accepts the terms, ready to leave her past life behind.

As she gets to know the residents and staff of the Bartholomew, Jules finds herself drawn to fellow apartment sitter Ingrid, who comfortingly, disturbingly reminds her of the sister she lost eight years ago. When Ingrid confides that the Bartholomew is not what it seems and the dark history hidden beneath its gleaming facade is starting to frighten her, Jules brushes it off as a harmless ghost story . . . until the next day, when Ingrid disappears.

Searching for the truth about Ingrid’s disappearance, Jules digs deeper into the Bartholomew’s dark past and into the secrets kept within its walls. Her discovery that Ingrid is not the first apartment sitter to go missing at the Bartholomew pits Jules against the clock as she races to unmask a killer, expose the building’s hidden past, and escape the Bartholomew before her temporary status becomes permanent.

Review: Thanks to NetGalley for sending me an eARC of this book!

While the combined phrase of ‘urban Gothic’ may seem like it contradicts itself, it’s a genre that can be really effective when done well. One example that comes to mind is “Rosemary’s Baby”, about a woman who has been isolated within the confines of a luxury apartment building in the middle of New York City (and she happens to be carrying the devil’s baby, but that’s neither here nor there for this comparison). The ability to make a character feel completely alone in the Gothic sense in the middle of a huge metropolis like Manhattan can take some finagling, and I’m happy to say that like Ira Levin before, Riley Sager has tapped into this theme with his newest thriller “Lock Every Door”. And while there’s no devil baby to be found, strange things are still afoot within the narrative and within the walls of the luxury apartment building The Bartholomew.

“Lock Every Door” follows Jules, a woman who has found herself nearly flat broke and without housing, so it’s natural that the strange offer of ‘apartment sitting’ in a glamorous building off of Central Park would be snatched up by her, odd rules be damned. We slowly learn that Jules isn’t just a naive woman who willfully ignores strange warning signs; she’s literally desperate. Being without a job, without housing, and with a dwindling bank account means that twelve thousand dollars is going to be worth more than rigid, downright draconian rules she has to abide by. I liked Jules a lot because she ISN’T foolish; she feels like she’s in a corner and has no choice. Because of this I had huge sympathy for her and wasn’t as fast to want to shake some sense into her. And she hasn’t necessarily willfully isolated herself for the most part; outside of her friend Chloe, she is basically alone in the world, as her parents are dead and her sister has been missing for years. For her these rules are very easy to live by simply because she is already isolated, even within a large metropolis. She is a complex and also tragic main character who I liked following, if only because of the believability with her in all aspects of the story. While some have suggested that she should have at least been more willing to ditch out as soon as the bad things start happening, I still maintain that sunk cost fallacies, desperation, and the constant gaslighting by modern society towards women and their anxieties made this believable to me. There were also well done supporting characters, from the helpful doorman Charlie who has personal pain of his own, and Chloe, who wants to support Jules in any way she can, but whose generosity can come off as condescension. 

But the strongest aspect of “Lock Every Door” was the incredibly suspenseful plot and setting of a gorgeous, but perhaps insidious, luxury apartment building. Described with intimidating architecture and disturbing gargoyles, and a tainted past to boot, it felt like a healthy mix of The Cecil Hotel and the Shandor Building in “Ghostbusters”. We know that something is happening inside and that the residents and realtors are hiding something, but Sager did a good job of keeping the details pretty close to the vest. Harkening back to Ira Levin and “Rosemary’s Baby”, the question of whether everyone is out to get your or you are just paranoid is prevalent in this book, as a vast conspiracy of neighbors simply couldn’t be possible in Jules’s mind. At least at first. The clues are dropped and the pieces are set out at a meticulous pace, and by the time we did find out what was going on I was pleasantly duped, and could also see how we got there, even if I didn’t notice it. The pacing was such that I had a very hard time putting this book down, and I needed to know what was going to happen next at the end of each chapter.

“Lock Every Door” was a creepy and nervewracking read, and another well done book by Riley Sager. The paranoia and tension will make this a great book to take on vacation this summer, but perhaps reading it alone at night would be second guessed.

Rating 8: An addictive thriller with shades of Hitchcock and “Rosemary’s Baby”, “Lock Every Door” will put you on edge and keep you guessing until the end.

Reader’s Advisory:

“Lock Every Door” is included on the Goodreads list “Mystery and Thriller 2019”, and would fit in on “Fiction that Features NYC”.

Find “Lock Every Door” at your library using WorldCat!

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